Historical

His Judas Bride By Shehanne Moore

Blog Diva - Tuesday, December 03, 2013

You are hereby ordered...

..............to fall upon the rebells, the McDonalds of Glenco, and put all to the sword under seventy. you are to have a speciall care that the old Fox and his sones doe upon no account escape your hands, you are to secure all the avenues that no man escape.’

Early in the morning of 13 February 1692 thirty-eight MacDonalds from the Clan MacDonald of Glencoe were killed by their guests. Another forty women and children died of exposure after their homes were burned.

The whole male population under 70 years of age, amounting to 200, would probably have fallen the to fire and sword letters. But a party of 400 soldiers dispatched to carry out the orders, were prevented by the severity of the weather--always dicey there from reaching Glencoe until eleven o'clock that night, six hours after the first shots were fired. By then the Macdonald men, warned of both the danger they were in and learning of the fate of their chief, had fled to the hills.  Read More

Silverhawk By Barbara Bettis

Blog Diva - Tuesday, November 26, 2013

He’s everything a proper lady should never want; she’s everything a bastard mercenary should never have.

This logline from SILVERHAWK reflects the heroes in all my medieval. In my debut novel, Giles—Silverhawk—is a leader in commander Mercadier’s troops. (Mercadier was a well-known mercenary, an historical figure who was one of King Richard the Lionheart’s ‘right hand’ men.)

Mercenaries were soldiers for hire. Some were commoners (especially the foot soldiers), while others were poor knights who were trying to prove themselves. Still others were victims of political reversals that saw their homes destroyed, and their family’s titles and holdings forfeit to a victorious enemy. They sold their swords to survive.­­­

Various accounts that have come down through the centuries portray mercenaries as ravaging hordes. Other reports have claimed they were no worse than other armies of the time, whose jobs were to defeat and conquer.  Read More

THE TWELFTH NIGHT WAGER By Regan Walker

Blog Diva - Tuesday, November 26, 2013

Twelfth Night in Regency England
by Regan Walker, author of the Christmas novella, THE TWELFTH NIGHT WAGER
http://www.reganwalkerauthor.com

Christmas in Regency England (1811-1820), when Prince George ruled as Prince Regent, was a more subtle celebration than the one we observe today. Christmastide, as the folks in Regency England called the season, began with Christmas Eve (though Christmas evening was “First Night”) and continued to Twelfth Night, January 5th, followed by the Feast of the Epiphany when the three wise men, the Magi, arrived in Bethlehem to behold the Christ child.

In country homes and estates where Christmas was celebrated, decorations went up on Christmas Eve and stayed up until Epiphany, the official end of the Yule season, when the greens would be taken down and burned in the fireplace.  Read More

Highlander's Hope By Collette Cameron

Blog Diva - Tuesday, November 12, 2013

Highlander's Hope Excerpt-Pirate Scene

Yvette stepped back as Ewan pushed his way into the room, leaving the door ajar. His hair was damp, no doubt from bathing, and the stubble darkening his face earlier was gone. Feet bare, wearing only buckskin breeches and a shirt unbuttoned to the waist, he resembled a pirate—a dangerous, rakish, sinfully handsome pirate.

She sucked in her breath. He oughtn’t to be here, but he’d said he wanted to talk to her, and he had promised to behave.

Yvette’s gaze traveled the path of silky hair from his chest until it disappeared into his waistband. Her stomach flip-flopped. Sweet Lord above. She pressed her hands to her frolicking middle. Why doesn’t he say something?

A distraction, that’s what she needed. Read More

Daring Damsels By Catherine Kean

Blog Diva - Tuesday, October 22, 2013

What happens when four bestselling, award-winning medieval romance authors decide to bring together some of their bold lords and willful ladies? The Daring Damsels boxed set is born.

Priced at just $0.99 for a limited time, the set includes fast-paced, thrilling novels by Eliza Knight, Catherine Kean, Laurel O’Donnell, and Denise Domning. The set is available on Kindle and Nook.

A LADY'S CHARADE by Eliza Knight

A Scottish LADY, abandoned and in disguise.  A KNIGHT who wants her dead.  But he could be her only savior in England--as long as he never discovers her identity.

DANCE OF DESIRE by Catherine Kean

One veiled LADY dances to save her brother's life. One LORD sheriff tormented by barbaric secrets claims her as his bride. The more she learns of him the harder it is to deny his love.  Read More

Once A Rake By Eileen Dreyer

Blog Diva - Saturday, October 12, 2013

The Things I Learned Today

I love research. I wasn't always this way. In fact, I sucked at it. This was back before dinosaurs when I was first trying to get published. The days of libraries and Dewey Decimal(look it up, you babies). I knew I could write a story. I'd been doing it for my friends since I was ten. But write about something with which I wasn't familiar? Well, let me put it this way. My first Kathleen Korbel book was about an ER nurse and Tom Selleck in St. Louis(PLAYING THE GAME). My second book was about a rural nurse who discovered an injured man at the bottom of a cliff(STRANGER'S SMILE). My third book was about an ER doc who meets a cop when she's held hostage for drugs in her ER(WORTH ANY RISK). You begin to see a pattern here, I imagine.

I'm a nurse. Nurses don't use libraries to learn stuff. We play with things. So I decided that I would perfect my storytelling as I learned how to research. And then, a miracle happened. Its called Google. Suddenly the world opened up to me. Where before if I wanted information I had to interview people, now I could sit home and break time and space barriers at a whim. I could write a book set anywhere, any time, because, with Google, I could find the tiniest details(did you know there was a full moon the night of Waterloo?) (It was important in the first book in my Drakes' Rakes series, BARELY A LADY).  Read More

Conquest Of The Heart By Michele Stegman

Blog Diva - Tuesday, October 08, 2013

Just how close to the facts do fiction writers have to stay? Hmmm. Depends on what kind of fiction you write. If you write about worlds in space, aliens on earth, vampires, or alternate realities, you can be pretty free with the facts. But what about those of us who write straight historical romance?

Most historical romance writers try to be as accurate as possible when it comes to the history in their books. I love learning history by reading an exciting romance. And I spend a lot of time looking up the history mentioned in those books. Not to check out the author's research, but to learn more because she has whetted my appetite.

I try to stay as close as possible to the historical facts, but in minor matters, I might sometimes stray. Forgive me. Read More

Gunpowder Tea By Margaret Brownley

Blog Diva - Sunday, October 06, 2013

More Love and Laughter in the Old West

Those Gutsy Heroines of the Old West


Never underestimate a woman doing a man’s job!

My passion is writing about the old west and the fabulous women who helped settle it. Western movies helped establish the male hero, but depicting women mainly as bonnet saints, soiled doves and schoolmarms did them a terrible disservice.

The westward migration freed women in ways never before imagined. Women abandoned Victorian traditions, rigid manners and confining clothes and that’s not all they did; they brought churches, schools and newspapers to frontier towns and helped build communities.  Read More

The Earl Who Played With Fire By Sara Ramsey

Blog Diva - Thursday, October 03, 2013

My fellow authoresses have thus far confessed their (mostly fictional) love affairs with rakes, but I have to admit that I have a penchant for rogues. But first, a definition: I don’t mean this as in ‘going rogue’, where the hero turns solitary and/or insanely murderous in his quest for whatever he’s seeking. Of course, there are some hot heroes who have gone rogue - Matt Damon’s Jason Bourne comes to mind (which means that I must fan myself off before continuing, since he’s really too hot for words).

But I’m speaking of the Regency-era rogue - the kind of man who has a perfect jest or cutting retort for any situation, whose tongue is just as skilled at conversation as it is at other, more pleasurable (ahem) tasks, and whose ruthlessness is tempered by a winning sense of humor. What woman can resist such a devilish combination? Read More

The Viscount's Vow By Collette Cameron

Blog Diva - Tuesday, October 01, 2013

A Chocoholic’s Take: Why Writing Romance is Like Chocolate.
I hear the nay-sayers. What does she mean writing romance is like chocolate? It’s quite fundamental actually. Writing romance and producing chocolate are very similar. Come on. Trust me in this.

The first thing you do in order to make chocolate is pick the beans, and then let them ferment. This is the choosing the plot and contemplating the story-line stage of writing romance. Here’s where writers decide on goals and motivations, the length of their novel, what the story arc will be...you know, all that fun pre-writing stuff. Even if you’re a pantser, which I am by-the-way, writers need a basic plot (cocoa beans) and a story line (fermenting).

The next step is processing the beans. All the stuff that can’t be made into chocolate (the story) has to be picked out. Then, the beans are dried and crushed. This is where the writer creates deep POV, develops their characters, introduces and develops conflict, and does rudimentary editing.  Read More