Historical

Unraveling Secrets By Lana Williams

Blog Diva - Tuesday, January 21, 2014

I’m so excited to return to RomCon to share my latest release, Unraveling Secrets! This is my fourth book and is set in Victorian London. My first three books are set in medieval England, so this is a change for me. This is the beginning of a new trilogy and I’m enjoying writing about this time period.

Abigail Bradford is a unique lady for her time as her hobby is investing. She was forced to learn to carefully manage her family’s very limited income after her father’s death. The good news is that she found she had a flare for it. It has become her passion and she shares it with everyone who will listen, much to her stepmother’s dismay.  Stephen, Viscount Ashbury, dabbles in electromagnetism. His interest in this particular science came as a result of a professor (one of his mentors) had a passion for the possibilities he believed it had.

Writing started as a hobby for me, but definitely turned into a passion. While it is incredibly challenging, there is nothing I love to do more. How about you? What hobby or passion do you have? What do you do that makes you happy?

Here’s a little more about Unraveling Secrets: Read More

The Convict And The Cattleman By Allison Merritt

Blog Diva - Tuesday, January 14, 2014

The History Behind The Convict and the Cattleman

I hadn't written anything creative in about five years when I started searching for ideas for a historical romance novel. Historicals have always been a favorite of mine and it seemed natural to write one. I was looking for something unique and I'll be the first to admit I thought Australia was mostly desert, full of dingos, kangaroos, and sheep. I knew it was settled by a large convict population, but I didn't know why or how or what penal colonies were like.

Captain James Cook was one of the first Englishmen to set eyes on the continent in 1770. He declared the territory New South Wales. First Fleet were the men who made up the first settlement in the territory on Botany Bay. They moved into Sydney Cove for better camping conditions a few days later.

Parramatta was selected as a place suitable for farming, where the river turned into fresh water. It played host to a penal colony across from Sydney. It housed correctional facilities beginning in 1798. The Factory Above the Gaol had housing for about 60 women who slept among bales of wool that they fashioned into material. Read More

Carolina Gold by Dorothy Love

Blog Diva - Tuesday, December 31, 2013

Excerpt from Carolina Gold by Dorothy Love

You’re certain you have everything?” Nicholas smiled down at Charlotte and placed a hand in the small of her back to guide her along the crowded platform. The train, belching cinders and smoke, waited on the siding. Passengers and draymen came and went from the station house, dodging Creole boys selling cigars, newspapers, and candies.

“I think so. I couldn’t sleep last night. I had plenty of time to pack.”

In the days since their kiss in the garden, they had seen little of each other. Nicholas’s work at the infirmary and meetings with the doctor who had arrived to replace him had kept him too busy for socializing. But he had insisted on escorting her to the station.

He bought two bonbons from a skinny boy in bright yellow pants and handed her one. “You won’t forget to give the girls their presents?” Read More

The Temptation Of Lady Serena By Ella Quinn

Blog Diva - Saturday, December 28, 2013

We are all about Rakes on this blog tour! After all, who doesn’t love a bad boy? We’ll I’m sure some ladies don’t, but not me. I married mine thirty years ago. Of course before I’d agree to accept his hand, he had to reform, not all the way mind you, just enough to make him good husband material. I’m here to tell you, a reformed rake makes a very good husband.

In The Seduction of Lady Phoebe, twenty-year-old Lord Marcus Finley starts out as a dissolute rogue, drinking to excess, gambling, and consorting with ladies of ill-repute, were only some of his faults. He was so bad, that even in racy Regency England his father decides to banish him to the West Indies before Marcus can cause a major scandal. Then at his last hurrah party in England, he meets and falls in love with Lady Phoebe Stanhope.

He knows she’s young, but not how young. Every woman he’s met so far, we’ll not discuss the caliber of the females he’s been with, have loved him, and he is confident he’ll be able to sweep her off her tiny feet and carry her away Gretna Green, then on to the West Indies. That didn’t go so well. You’ll remember the bit about drinking. Phoebe ends up giving him a good piece of her mind, and he slinks off to the West Indies, drunk. Read More

The Christmas Bride By Sylvia McDaniel

Blog Diva - Tuesday, December 17, 2013

Fort Worth, Texas a Wild Place

While doing research for my series The Burnett Brides, I read a book called HELLS HALF ACRE by Richard F. Selcer. This book gives details about a half acre section in downtown Fort Worth in the late 19th century where cowboys, gunslingers and gamblers frequented. This area of town had everything a traveling cowboy could ever want when they came to town with the cattle drives; saloons, dance houses, bordellos, cribs and gambling.

Many lawmen from this era were reformed gunslingers and men who had decided against a life of crime. Given the time they lived in, I'm sure they lived longer by being quick with a gun in the wild, lawless town. But they also were often friends and acquaintances with gamblers and gunslingers.

The other piece of information I came across in this book that made me dig deeper for a later book I wrote was the availability of opium. You could buy it in a drug store, or if you couldn't get it there, just go down the street to the Chinese laundry where it was available. There were opium dens in the city that people often frequented, even though they were against the law. I was stunned at the number of individuals who were addicted to drugs and used that information in another novel.  Read More

Time Will Tell By Sandy Loyd

Blog Diva - Tuesday, December 10, 2013

Hi, all! I’m so pleased to be back at RomCon. Thanks for hosting me again. For those who don’t know me, my name is Sandy Loyd and I’m a romance writer. As a Sales Manager for a jewelry manufacturer in my previous profession, I’ve worked and lived in some of the most fabulous places in the US, including Northern California and South Florida. Every place I’ve visited or lived over the years has given me memories on which to draw from for the stories I create. I now call the blue grass state of Kentucky home, where I write full time.

Today, I’d like to talk about my latest romance, Time Will Tell, and my inspiration for writing it.

When friends ask me what I love best about living in Kentucky, the list is long. The people are warm and welcoming. The weather isn’t too bad. Louisville is big enough to provide a cosmopolitan feel without the downside of larger cities like congestion and traffic. But what I love most about living here is having a thoroughbred racetrack right in my back yard. Not just any racetrack, mind you, but Churchill Downs, home to the Kentucky Derby, a horserace that’s run every first Saturday in May and is the beginning leg of the triple crown of thoroughbred horse racing. Read More

His Judas Bride By Shehanne Moore

Blog Diva - Tuesday, December 03, 2013

You are hereby ordered...

..............to fall upon the rebells, the McDonalds of Glenco, and put all to the sword under seventy. you are to have a speciall care that the old Fox and his sones doe upon no account escape your hands, you are to secure all the avenues that no man escape.’

Early in the morning of 13 February 1692 thirty-eight MacDonalds from the Clan MacDonald of Glencoe were killed by their guests. Another forty women and children died of exposure after their homes were burned.

The whole male population under 70 years of age, amounting to 200, would probably have fallen the to fire and sword letters. But a party of 400 soldiers dispatched to carry out the orders, were prevented by the severity of the weather--always dicey there from reaching Glencoe until eleven o'clock that night, six hours after the first shots were fired. By then the Macdonald men, warned of both the danger they were in and learning of the fate of their chief, had fled to the hills.  Read More

Silverhawk By Barbara Bettis

Blog Diva - Tuesday, November 26, 2013

He’s everything a proper lady should never want; she’s everything a bastard mercenary should never have.

This logline from SILVERHAWK reflects the heroes in all my medieval. In my debut novel, Giles—Silverhawk—is a leader in commander Mercadier’s troops. (Mercadier was a well-known mercenary, an historical figure who was one of King Richard the Lionheart’s ‘right hand’ men.)

Mercenaries were soldiers for hire. Some were commoners (especially the foot soldiers), while others were poor knights who were trying to prove themselves. Still others were victims of political reversals that saw their homes destroyed, and their family’s titles and holdings forfeit to a victorious enemy. They sold their swords to survive.­­­

Various accounts that have come down through the centuries portray mercenaries as ravaging hordes. Other reports have claimed they were no worse than other armies of the time, whose jobs were to defeat and conquer.  Read More

THE TWELFTH NIGHT WAGER By Regan Walker

Blog Diva - Tuesday, November 26, 2013

Twelfth Night in Regency England
by Regan Walker, author of the Christmas novella, THE TWELFTH NIGHT WAGER
http://www.reganwalkerauthor.com

Christmas in Regency England (1811-1820), when Prince George ruled as Prince Regent, was a more subtle celebration than the one we observe today. Christmastide, as the folks in Regency England called the season, began with Christmas Eve (though Christmas evening was “First Night”) and continued to Twelfth Night, January 5th, followed by the Feast of the Epiphany when the three wise men, the Magi, arrived in Bethlehem to behold the Christ child.

In country homes and estates where Christmas was celebrated, decorations went up on Christmas Eve and stayed up until Epiphany, the official end of the Yule season, when the greens would be taken down and burned in the fireplace.  Read More

Highlander's Hope By Collette Cameron

Blog Diva - Tuesday, November 12, 2013

Highlander's Hope Excerpt-Pirate Scene

Yvette stepped back as Ewan pushed his way into the room, leaving the door ajar. His hair was damp, no doubt from bathing, and the stubble darkening his face earlier was gone. Feet bare, wearing only buckskin breeches and a shirt unbuttoned to the waist, he resembled a pirate—a dangerous, rakish, sinfully handsome pirate.

She sucked in her breath. He oughtn’t to be here, but he’d said he wanted to talk to her, and he had promised to behave.

Yvette’s gaze traveled the path of silky hair from his chest until it disappeared into his waistband. Her stomach flip-flopped. Sweet Lord above. She pressed her hands to her frolicking middle. Why doesn’t he say something?

A distraction, that’s what she needed. Read More